Volunteer Picnic at Bonython Park

As a sign of appreciation to our Volunteer Team, who contributed so much towards our recent Jubilee, we had organised a thank you BBQ lunch at Bonython Park on Saturday the 6th of October. Seventeen volunteers attended, along with some of the management committee. 

Everybody thoroughly enjoyed the day. Naturally, the food was spectacular! There was plenty of chicken wings, sausages and bulgogi beef to go around. There was opportunity to chat and have a few laughs. The weather was wonderful, people were able to stroll and explore the park.

If you would like to get involved with the Muslim Women’s Association of SA, contribute to a team effort in helping the community and enjoy an occasional social day out, click here to go to our Volunteer page and send us through your details. 

Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens Learning Journey

The Muslim Women’s Association of SA provides several services to men and women over the age of 65 years who are coming from a CaLD (Culturally and Linguistically Diverse) background, under the CHSP (Commonwealth Home Support Program). 

On Thursday 4th of October 2018 an outing to Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens was planned as a Learning Journey.

Those who were attending met at our office on Victoria Square and caught a coach out to Mt Lofty. 

The weather was perfect for walking, overcast but not raining and with a cool breeze.  

The men and women were able to explore the Gardens at their leisure and work up an appetite before sharing a picnic lunch. The group came very well prepared for the picnic with delicious home-made delicacies in picnic baskets and even a table cloth for the picnic table. 

Everyone was very interested to read the signage on-site, in doing so everyone was able to learn about the plants and about the history of Adelaide and also about the Flinders Column. 

It was a wonderful opportunity for them to literally stop and smell the flowers, to socialise and catch up with each other. 

Over 20 Members attended and the general consensus from everyone is that they enjoyed the day immensely. They are looking forward to going back to the Gardens in Autumn time and are, of course, looking forward to the next CHSP Learning Journey. 

For more information about the CHSP and how to join, click here
 
 

Usrah Study Circle

Our Usrah is a group of enthusiastic Muslim sisters getting together with faith in Islam, working and helping out one another, working together towards a better understanding and practice of Islam. The Usrah study circle provides direction towards building self-confidence in a process of developing a balanced and well composed Muslimah in all aspects – spiritually, mentally and physically.

The following programs are conducted in our Usrah Study Circle for Muslim women. To benefit from these programs, you need to be a member. Our annual membership fees are $10 and you can walk-in to our office to apply for membership.

1. Tajweed Class (Quranic recitation and grammar class)

Sisters learn how to read the Quran and the basic rules of Tajweed (Quranic recitation and grammar) so that they are able to recite the Quran in all its glory confidently. This class is designed for students with no knowledge of Tajweed to an intermediate level reciting and recognising the basics of Tajweed.

Details:
Every Monday (except Public Holidays)
10am – 11.20am

2. Islamic Talk / Discussion

Led by Dr Rokkiah Tawi in English, sisters gather on Mondays to benefit from Islamic discussions. Some of these talks/discussions focus on Tafseer where sisters analyse verses from the Quran and relate to everyday events and problems in the lives of Muslim women. Currently, sisters are learning about the 99 Names of Allah (Asma ul Husna).

Details:
Every Monday (except Public Holidays)
11.30am – 12.30pm

3. Conversational Arabic Class

This course is for learning how to speak and converse in Arabic. This is suitable for beginners who know how to read and write Arabic. The class is conducted in English.

Details:
Every Monday (except Public Holidays)
1pm – 2pm

All classes are conducted at our office in the city – Level 4, 182 Victoria Square, SA 5000.

ACE (Adult Community Education) 2018 Schedule

Our ACE (Adult Community Education) Program aims to improve the language, literacy and computing skills of women who face economic and social barriers that prevent them from moving on to higher level training or finding a job or seeking volunteer opportunities.

Weekly classes are held in our office and in Salisbury. The classes are delivered in an informal, easy to access community setting.

Adult Learners’ Week 2018

The Muslim Women’s Association of SA (MWASA) participated in Adult Learners’ Week 2018, as we do every year. It was thoroughly enjoyed and very successful, as it is every year.

The theme this year was Discover Nature and History. With that in mind, the program coordinator planned outings to the Migration Museum to learn more about the history of migration and to the Botanical Gardens to learn more about nature. 

Our event was attended mainly by our ACE (Adult Community Education) students, who come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds and have called Australia home for varying lengths of time. 

Those who attended learnt about migration through history and about the struggles those migrants faced. It was a wonderful opportunity to learn about other cultures, as well. During this time the Museum was showcasing Croatian culture and had a variety of dresses, photos, musical instruments and sporting equipment on exhibit. There was a photographic story of a Polish family who migrated to Australia in the 1960s and a handout on Russian migrants was available. Our students were able to relate to the struggles of past migrants and were inspired by the new and positive lives that have been built in Australia. 

The guided tour of the Botanical Gardens was loved by everyone. The weather was spectacular, all sunshine and fresh air. The guides were sensitive and informative. Through the use of interpreters the group members developed a keen interest in the Gardens, as they were more easily able to understand the information provided. Our group members enjoyed a shared lunch, a lovely way to end the day and encourage social networking.

One of our goals is to introduce educational resources to our members which they can then feel comfortable accessing by themselves in the future. Some in attendance had not visited these places before but have said they feel confidant to take their family and friends back. The students gave positive feedback about the trip.

The things learnt during this trip will be discussed further during the weekly program classes. The students are able to express and exchange views on different topics, this helps with improving conversational skills and making new friends. 

A continuing goal of MWASA is to provide opportunities and support to women on their learning journey. There are already plans being made for next term’s excursion: guided tours of the State Library and Central Market!

For more information about the MWASA ACE Program, click here

MyGov and My Aged Care talk for seniors

With most transactions and communications being done online, it is important for the seniors in our community to know how to access information and assistance schemes online.

In collaboration with Centrelink and Bene Aged Care, MWASA organised a ‘hands on’ session to help seniors learn how they could access their accounts and assistance schemes on the myGov portal and My Aged Care portal.

While using technology and computers can be a tedious process for most seniors, our group of 34 seniors were able to rise up to the challenge and learnt how to use online portals and services provided by aged care providers.

26 April 2018

Emergency Relief Assistance Available

As a regular service, the Muslim Women’s Association of SA provides Emergency Relief to Muslim women and their families…

MWASA is currently in the fortunate position of being able to offer Emergency Relief (for example food vouchers) to Muslim women and their families who are living in the South Eastern region and Southern Adelaide.

We are asking eligible women to contact us so that we can discuss what assistance is available.

We encourage community service providers in the areas specified above to contact us if they wish to refer an eligible client for assistance.

Please don’t hesitate to email or call with any queries or concerns.

You can contact us either by email to admin@mwasa.org.au or by calling the Muslim Women’s Association of SA office on (08) 8212 0800 and speaking to either Shaista or Noor.

To view and print the official letter from our Chairperson, click here: ER_Letter

Refugee Week Event ‘A New Day’

Refugee-Week

The Muslim Women’s Association of SA invites women from the Adelaide metropolitan region to join us in celebration of Refugee Week 2016.

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There will be:

  • A screening of ‘By Compass and Quran’, a documentary film delving into the lives of the Muslim Cameleers

  • A success story shared by a refugee woman

  • Experiences shared by refugees of their first few weeks in Australia

You are welcome to wear your traditional clothes and bring a plate of food to share.

 

DATE

Friday 3 June 2016

 

TIME

10:30am – 1:30pm

 

COST

FREE

 

LOCATION

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Muslim Women's Association of SA Level 4, 182 Victoria Square, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

If you are coming by public transport, click here to plan your journey.

 

RSVP

Phone the office on 08 8212 0800, or email admin@mwasa.org.au by Friday 27 May 2016.

 

To view and print a flyer for this event, click here: ‘A New Day’ poster

Information Session on Managing a Budget

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This information session on managing a basic budget has been organised specifically for newly arrived Muslim women who have been in Australia for 5 years or less as a refugee/humanitarian entrant.

Maria Rees, Financial Counsellor, will be presenting. Play money and a case study will be used to learn how to manage a basic budget. Topics covered will include discussion about common issues which affect budgeting and information on NILS (No Interest Loan Scheme).

Interpreter and refreshments provided.

For further information please call the office on 08 8212 0800 and speak with Shaista.

 

DATE

Friday 1 April 2016

 

TIME

10:30am – 1pm

 

COST

FREE

 

LOCATION

TitleCategoryAddressDescription
Muslim Women's Association of SA Level 4, 182 Victoria Square, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

If you are coming by public transport, click here to plan your journey.

 

MWASA is funded for this project by the Australian Government Department of Social Services through the Settlement Grants Program.

 

To view and print a flyer for this event, click here: Info Session_Managing Budget

Commonwealth Home Support Program

The Muslim Women’s Association of South Australia provides several support services for seniors aged 65 years and above, under the Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP).
The CHSP aims to provide high quality support to frail, older people to maximize their independence at home and in the community.
Support services include:
  • Information Sessions/Talks
  • Recreational Activities
  • Excursions
  • Advice
If you are 65 years or older, you can join our program by registering with My Aged Care.
For more information please contact our Project Officer, Shakirah, on 8212 0800.
To view and print a flyer for this program please click this link: CHSP pamphlet design

Climate Change Message

These are the words of Imam Ensar Cutahija (Adelaide City Mosque), who delivered a talk at the multi-faith conference on climate change in late October at the Hawke Centre (Uni SA West Campus).

CORE OF THE PROBLEM

“Well, what is the real problem?”

It’s the way we live. It’s the idea of consumerism, that by and through material things we are taught that this is the way to happiness.

 

CAUSE OF THE PROBLEM

It’s because we have turned away from our Creator, lost our purpose, our souls seek satisfaction in the material. But we can never find it there, so we consume more and more, hoping that if we just have this or that then we’ll be happy. But we are not.

It’s only when we understand the true purpose of our life and surrender to the will of our Creator that we can find true happiness. Just see how everything follows the laws and patterns and systems laid down for them by the wise Creator. They all submit to God. It is only when we also follow the guidance and systems and patterns laid down for us by the Creator that we can also be in harmony with the universe and world around us.

 

ISLAMIC SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM

Islam teaches that we are responsible and accountable for everything we do. Our bodies, our health, our lives, our wealth, the planet and all that is in it has been entrusted to us, and Allah is going to ask us about what we did with it.

By being Muslim you are already on the first and most important step to being in tune and living in harmony with your environment.  The whole universe is in a state of submission to the laws of it’s Creator. The very word ‘Muslim’ means someone who submits to God. In this profound spiritual sense a Muslim is in harmony with the universe.

The Almighty Creator said:

“There is not a living creature on earth, nor a bird that flies with it’s two wings, but are communities like you.”

The Qur’aan, 6:38

The Muslims know that this world is a test. You know that in good deeds and obeying your Lord and seeking His pleasure is the real path to happiness and success, and as you live and feel that, you become content with what Allah has provided you with and are happy with what suffices your bare needs. This is the way we can think in a completely different way from the enslavement of consumerism that is in part destroying our world.

We have been warned by Allah and His messenger against waste and excess:

“Verily spendthrifts are brothers of the Evil Ones; and the Evil One is to his Lord (himself) ungrateful.”

The Qur’aan, 17:27

Abdullah ibn Amr ibn Al-`Aas reported that the Prophet ﷺ passed one day by Sa`d ibn Abi Waqas while he was performing wudu (ritual washing of body parts in preparation for prayer). The prophet asked Sa`d, “Why this wastage?” Sa`d replied “Is there wastage in wudu also?” The Prophet said, “Yes, even if you are at a flowing river.” [Ahmad]

So even when there is plenty, we should take care not to be wasteful!  Part of being a Muslim is being conscious, modest and moderate, aware and realising that one is accountable.

Ultimately all the problems burdening humanity come from sick hearts. Hearts that are detached from their real purpose which is knowing and remembering Allah, for in this alone do hearts find rest. So it is inevitable that when humanity is distant from their Lord, evils will emerge:

“Corruption has appeared throughout the land and sea by [reason of] what the hands of people have earned so He may let them taste part of [the consequence of] what they have done that perhaps they will return [to righteousness]”

The Qur’aan, 30:41

When we turn to other than Allah and set up false objects besides Him, in which we place our hope, trust and love, our hearts become corrupted and the earth on which we dwell also falls into corruption.

The solution, then, is to return to our Lord and to single Him out alone for our obedience and adoration. The hearts are then filled with the peace and tranquility for which they long.

It is empty, corrupt hearts that are destroying our world and it is only whole and fulfilled hearts that can mend it.

The cure for the hearts is a living, vibrant and real connection with our Creator, not merely some passive ritualistic emulation of it.

Of course many point out that the most excessive consumers and producers of carbon fuels are in fact Muslims. This is not however the correct manner in which to judge Islam itself. There are many reasons for this discrepancy between the claim to be Muslim and Islamic and the reality of what it entails. Part of the problem that besets the Muslim world is following a hollow ritualistic shadow of Islam. If we merely go through motions of the outer acts of worship without imbibing their inner dynamics we will not change anything. This is exactly the problem with many Muslims all over the world. They perform prayers without understanding a word. They fast by abstaining from food and drink but do not leave the evil in their words and deeds.

The Prophet ﷺ said: “Whoever does not give up false speech and acting upon it and offensive speech and behaviour, Allah has no need of his giving up his food and drink.” [Sahih al-Bukhari]

This is a very profound statement, the one we should reflect upon in respect to all of the rituals of Islam. These outer rituals have an inner purpose. Islam needs to be lived inwardly and outwardly. Only then will it become the cure for the ills besetting our world.

The faith leaders must use their influence in raising awareness in their communities, starting with their places of worship. Together and only together, their voices can make the difference. Politicians will listen and corporations will act if sermons change the consumption habits and lifestyles of society.

We are not ‘eating to live’ but rather ‘living to eat’. This has to change.

The Prophet Muhammad ﷺ taught us to leave one-third of our stomach empty when eating a meal. He ate only when he was hungry and would never fill up his stomach.

We love our Prophet, but we love our super-size burgers more.

By having more than we need we nourish our selfishness and ego, becoming self-important beyond imagination. This is neither good nor moral. This is not our mission in this temporary world.

The Messenger ﷺ also reminded us that we cannot make good believers if we had enough food in our home and our neighbours go to their beds hungry without having food for dinner. By having said this he did not mention that our neighbors had to be Muslims to enjoy this courtesy – all they have to be is our neighbour!

I would conclude by the passage from the Holy Qur’an:

“And [the righteous are] those who, when they spend, do so not excessively or sparingly but hold a medium way between those.”

The Qur’aan, 25:67