February Recipes of Life Update

The tutors and the participants discussed the main dishes which will be prepared at a future Shared Lunch.

The group wrote all the ingredients, with their quantities, for the main dishes (Falafel (below), Kabab hindi, Kanafeh).

Furthermore, it was discussed how much time each dish will take so the time can be managed on the day.

Maryam very kindly offered to demonstrate making Kebab Hindi at the next class. 

Heam made Kanafeh (below) and she did very well.

First SETS* Social Saturday

Yasmin and Manal from ActNow Theatre conducted a consultation on dealing with Islamophobia in Australia, which will be at the base of the theatrical acts to be performed at various schools around South Australia.
The games included in the session made it more interesting and helped new girls to feel part of the group.
The session included questions like “what is good about being a Muslim in
Australia?”, “what is hard about being a Muslim in Australia?”, “what do you want people to know about Muslims?” and “what do you want people to know about you?”.
Some things the girls found hard about being a Muslim in Australia was finding halal food, having to explain yourself and your religious cultural rituals and practices, dealing with racism, and getting used to the culture and language differences in Australia.
“I am nice/kind person”, “I wear my scarf by my own will” and “I speak English very well and I like to socialise” were some things the girls wanted to let other people know about them.
Yasmin and Manal also offered the girls to be part of theatre acts with the ActNow Theatre.

*SETS: Settlement Engagement and Transition Support – Client Services

Muslims Meals Project @ Old Bazaar Market

The Muslim Women’s Association of SA (MWASA) supported Multicultural Aged Care (MAC) in the launch of the Muslim (Seniors) Meals Project last week at the Old Bazaar Market, Hollywood Plaza.
 
MWASA – along with other community service providers such as Uniting Communities, ARAS (Aged Rights Advocacy Service) and Catalyst Foundation – had a stall at the expo to share information with the public on our respective services and activities.  
 
About 20 of our CHSP seniors participated in the event. After the launch, they visited the information booth and then were treated to lunch. The seniors thoroughly enjoyed the day as they were able to eat lunch and socialize with their peers in a relaxed and comfortable ambience. 
 

Migration Museum a Must at any Age!

A visit to the Migration Museum was scheduled on 26 September 2019 as part of the CHSP (Commonwealth Home Support Program).

The excursion coincided with the celebration of the 22nd year of the SALA (South Australian Living Artists) Festival, where 8,000 artists participated in 700 exhibitions across Adelaide and regional SA.

Ten members participated in this event.

The group started with a leisurely walk to the Migration Museum. The weather was excellent and the 30 minute walk was good exercise for the seniors.

The Migration Museum offers a range of permanent and temporary exhibitions and activities. The exhibitions that were showcased on the day include:

  • Portraits of Elizabeth explores the migration experience and the resilience of community through the stories of Elizabethans, both past and present.
  • Island Welcome Exhibition explores contemporary jewellery as a gesture of greeting in response to current Australian immigration and refugee policy.
  • Leaving Britain & Establishing South Australia explores what it was like for British settlers making the journey to South Australia and taking the first steps towards building a new colony.

Next, the seniors visited the Art Museum which showcased the exhibition “Love From Damascus: The art of devotion in Islam”. The exhibition explores the divine and worldly aspects of Islamic devotion expressed artistically over one thousand years. 

A Cross Cultural Exploration of Women’s Rights Through Time

One Saturday towards the end of September, MWASA (Muslim Women’s Association of SA) held “A cross-cultural exploration of women’s rights through time to commemorate 125 years of women’s suffrage in SA”. 

The event was held in the Bradley Forum of the Hawke Centre, on the UniSA City West campus. UniSA allows the centre to be used for educational free community events and we acknowledge and thank them for that. 

The event was opened with a lovely Quran recitation from Sister Ulfat. She recited paragraph 35 of the chapter Al Ahzab (known in English as The Confederates) in the original Arabic and then the English translation was shared so that everybody could fully appreciate the meaning. For your convenience we have included the paragraph here. 

Following the Quran recitation, Chairperson Dora Abbas welcomed the gathering with a few dignified words. 

Each speaker of the day was introduced by a supremely elegant MC: Sister Peta Abdalla

The Guest of Honour for this event was Katrine Hildyard MP. Katrine works tirelessly towards bettering the lives of all South Australians. In Katrine’s fight for a fair and inclusive society she has actively encouraged and made space for CaLD women to have their voice heard in parliament. She shared with us a few words about her own personal journey and experiences as a female Member of Parliament. Everyone present was touched by Katrine’s words, she is truly a brave and highly motivated woman. 

Presenting directly on the SA women’s suffrage movement was Mandy Paul. Mandy is Director at the SA Migration Museum and she herself contains an immense wealth of state history. Her speech was accompanied by a slideshow, it was very interesting to put faces to the names of the leading suffragists and their key supporters. Whilst celebrating the achievements of the suffragists, we must acknowledge and respect that the same freedoms were not extended to Aboriginal men and women until much later. We are grateful for and enriched by Mandy’s unbiased talk. 

Presenting a Muslim woman’s perspective on the SA women’s suffrage movement was Melati Lum. Melati Lum is a practising lawyer specialising in public law and criminal prosection, an Australian/Malay/Chinese Muslim mum, and author of the Ayesha Dean mystery series for children. In her spare time, she is working on her next novel for a young adult audience. Melati brought several historical Muslim women to life for the audience by recounting some monumental achievements. There is a misconception that Islam oppresses women, when in reality it is humans who oppress each other and rather Islamic guidelines provide structure where a woman can be heard and be successful with her education and/or business empire. 

Proceedings were concluded with an opportunity for all attendees to network over refreshments. 

Catering

Event Feedback

Everybody had the opportunity to provide feedback after the event. A template was provided asking specifically how satisfied people were with everything from promotions before the event, to the venue and seating, to each of the speeches. We can proudly say that we received 5 out of 5 across the board! 

Event Photos

For more information about the Suffragists

Office for Women Anniversary of Suffrage page

Office for Women Suffrage Fact Sheet

Centre of Democracy Fact Sheet

Seniors very prepared for Ramadan

Throughout the month of May, our seniors group met regularly in preparation for Ramadan.

The first gathering was for ‘Ramadan Love Letter’, a session led by Sister Nurhayati who is a graduate from Al Azhar University majoring in Shariah Islamiah. She is a recognised Asatizah by the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore. She also did her Post Graduate diploma in Islamic Law. 

The number of participants exceeded expectations. All attendees were captivated and engaged in listening to the guest speaker. Sister Nurhayati explained thoroughly the revelation prescribing Ramadan and the rationale behind fasting. 

Following on from Ramadan Love Letter was 3 Tajweed classes (reading the Quran with correct pronunciation and grammar), led by Sister Hanna. Some of the ladies from the seniors group enjoyed the Quran reading so much that they will in future also attend the Monday classes

This program was a huge success; the feedback received was overwhelmingly positive, all sessions went smoothly and the group is looking forward to future similar sessions.

For more information about our program for men and women aged over 65 years, go to our CHSP page.

Climate Change Message

These are the words of Imam Ensar Cutahija (Adelaide City Mosque), who delivered a talk at the multi-faith conference on climate change in late October at the Hawke Centre (Uni SA West Campus).

CORE OF THE PROBLEM

“Well, what is the real problem?”

It’s the way we live. It’s the idea of consumerism, that by and through material things we are taught that this is the way to happiness.

 

CAUSE OF THE PROBLEM

It’s because we have turned away from our Creator, lost our purpose, our souls seek satisfaction in the material. But we can never find it there, so we consume more and more, hoping that if we just have this or that then we’ll be happy. But we are not.

It’s only when we understand the true purpose of our life and surrender to the will of our Creator that we can find true happiness. Just see how everything follows the laws and patterns and systems laid down for them by the wise Creator. They all submit to God. It is only when we also follow the guidance and systems and patterns laid down for us by the Creator that we can also be in harmony with the universe and world around us.

 

ISLAMIC SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM

Islam teaches that we are responsible and accountable for everything we do. Our bodies, our health, our lives, our wealth, the planet and all that is in it has been entrusted to us, and Allah is going to ask us about what we did with it.

By being Muslim you are already on the first and most important step to being in tune and living in harmony with your environment.  The whole universe is in a state of submission to the laws of it’s Creator. The very word ‘Muslim’ means someone who submits to God. In this profound spiritual sense a Muslim is in harmony with the universe.

The Almighty Creator said:

“There is not a living creature on earth, nor a bird that flies with it’s two wings, but are communities like you.”

The Qur’aan, 6:38

The Muslims know that this world is a test. You know that in good deeds and obeying your Lord and seeking His pleasure is the real path to happiness and success, and as you live and feel that, you become content with what Allah has provided you with and are happy with what suffices your bare needs. This is the way we can think in a completely different way from the enslavement of consumerism that is in part destroying our world.

We have been warned by Allah and His messenger against waste and excess:

“Verily spendthrifts are brothers of the Evil Ones; and the Evil One is to his Lord (himself) ungrateful.”

The Qur’aan, 17:27

Abdullah ibn Amr ibn Al-`Aas reported that the Prophet ﷺ passed one day by Sa`d ibn Abi Waqas while he was performing wudu (ritual washing of body parts in preparation for prayer). The prophet asked Sa`d, “Why this wastage?” Sa`d replied “Is there wastage in wudu also?” The Prophet said, “Yes, even if you are at a flowing river.” [Ahmad]

So even when there is plenty, we should take care not to be wasteful!  Part of being a Muslim is being conscious, modest and moderate, aware and realising that one is accountable.

Ultimately all the problems burdening humanity come from sick hearts. Hearts that are detached from their real purpose which is knowing and remembering Allah, for in this alone do hearts find rest. So it is inevitable that when humanity is distant from their Lord, evils will emerge:

“Corruption has appeared throughout the land and sea by [reason of] what the hands of people have earned so He may let them taste part of [the consequence of] what they have done that perhaps they will return [to righteousness]”

The Qur’aan, 30:41

When we turn to other than Allah and set up false objects besides Him, in which we place our hope, trust and love, our hearts become corrupted and the earth on which we dwell also falls into corruption.

The solution, then, is to return to our Lord and to single Him out alone for our obedience and adoration. The hearts are then filled with the peace and tranquility for which they long.

It is empty, corrupt hearts that are destroying our world and it is only whole and fulfilled hearts that can mend it.

The cure for the hearts is a living, vibrant and real connection with our Creator, not merely some passive ritualistic emulation of it.

Of course many point out that the most excessive consumers and producers of carbon fuels are in fact Muslims. This is not however the correct manner in which to judge Islam itself. There are many reasons for this discrepancy between the claim to be Muslim and Islamic and the reality of what it entails. Part of the problem that besets the Muslim world is following a hollow ritualistic shadow of Islam. If we merely go through motions of the outer acts of worship without imbibing their inner dynamics we will not change anything. This is exactly the problem with many Muslims all over the world. They perform prayers without understanding a word. They fast by abstaining from food and drink but do not leave the evil in their words and deeds.

The Prophet ﷺ said: “Whoever does not give up false speech and acting upon it and offensive speech and behaviour, Allah has no need of his giving up his food and drink.” [Sahih al-Bukhari]

This is a very profound statement, the one we should reflect upon in respect to all of the rituals of Islam. These outer rituals have an inner purpose. Islam needs to be lived inwardly and outwardly. Only then will it become the cure for the ills besetting our world.

The faith leaders must use their influence in raising awareness in their communities, starting with their places of worship. Together and only together, their voices can make the difference. Politicians will listen and corporations will act if sermons change the consumption habits and lifestyles of society.

We are not ‘eating to live’ but rather ‘living to eat’. This has to change.

The Prophet Muhammad ﷺ taught us to leave one-third of our stomach empty when eating a meal. He ate only when he was hungry and would never fill up his stomach.

We love our Prophet, but we love our super-size burgers more.

By having more than we need we nourish our selfishness and ego, becoming self-important beyond imagination. This is neither good nor moral. This is not our mission in this temporary world.

The Messenger ﷺ also reminded us that we cannot make good believers if we had enough food in our home and our neighbours go to their beds hungry without having food for dinner. By having said this he did not mention that our neighbors had to be Muslims to enjoy this courtesy – all they have to be is our neighbour!

I would conclude by the passage from the Holy Qur’an:

“And [the righteous are] those who, when they spend, do so not excessively or sparingly but hold a medium way between those.”

The Qur’aan, 25:67

 

Award from International Centre of Muslim and non-Muslim Understanding

award

In December 2013 the University of South Australia presented MWASA with an award for ‘Muslim and non-Muslim understanding’, to honour our effort in the building
of bridges of understanding over the last 20 years.

Through our Cross Cultural training and various other programs we reach over 400 individuals yearly in educating them about Islam and Muslims. Through these
programs we encourage people to think beyond religious and cultural differences and focus on the character of people.

MWASA would like to acknowledge and thank the University of South Australia for initiating this award that helps foster understanding and respect among people of
different backgrounds and religions.

COUNTERING STEREOTYPES – MUSLIM WOMEN

18TH MAY, 2013

 The second part of the exhibition was titled ‘Muslim Women: Countering Stereotypes’ and was held on Saturday the 18th of May. Here, four successful Muslim women spoke about their experiences and careers and how Islam has remained a part of them throughout their lives. The purpose of this was to alleviate the stereotype of Muslim women being ‘oppressed’ and ‘conventional’.

Sister Azidah got the ball rolling with her enlightening presentation. Azidah invited the audience to think about society’s expectations and stereotypes of women.  That is – how do you characterise “successful women” or “good wives”? The audience responded with characteristics such as being ‘loyal’ and ‘supportive’.

She noted that everyone will have their own opinions and a range is to be expected.  Muslims are instructed to live by the standards set by Allah in His revelation, the Holy Quran.  So she spoke about the two women highly commended in the Quran – one a young lady and the other a wife.  Azidah shared that the women were Mariam or the Virgin Mary as the West know her, and the other is the Pharaoh’s wife, or better known as the adopted mother of Prophet Moses/Musa.  The wife of the Pharaoh refused to worship her husband and chose the one God instead. Mary was a young single mother who had to flee from her people because of her pregnancy.   Azidah then asked the audience to reflect in what ways these two women fit the conventional ideas of successful or good women. Neither was what society would generally consider typical role models.  In contrast these women stood out for their independence, courage and grace under difficult circumstances.  Most important to them was being true to their Lord and Creator, rather than fulfilling society’s expectations of them.

There are many other women who meet the conventional ideas of good women and could easily have been picked as examples instead. Azidah concluded that in holding up these two women as examples, the Quran invites us to rethink what stereotypes we impose on ourselves and others.  There will always be misconceptions and false standards.  Like the two women we can choose to free ourselves by acting in the light of revealed guidance.

After this brilliant presentation Sister Laila El Assaad, a teacher at the Islamic College of SA, a SACE moderator, a wife and mother of three told her story. The first thing that Laila said was that she never felt any different to her non-Muslim friends. Her struggles were the same as other women. She told the guests about her family history and life growing up. Working at the Islamic college Laila is around young Muslims all day and she said she felt that the girls in her school were strong and resilient contrary to what the stereotype placed on them may be.

Melati Lum was the second speaker.  Melati is currently working as a trial lawyer for the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions. Melati is also a committee member of the Women’s Advisory Committee of SA Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs Commission, and a board member of Islamic Foundation Australia.  Melati’s main point is that Islam never stopped her from doing the things she wanted to do. She has had the opportunity to travel overseas and work with the UN.  She has participated in sports such as taekwondo even with a hijab.  While Melati no longer wears the hijab – this seemed surprising to some of the audience members – she explained that she wore it without trouble for 17 years. Her decision to remove it was a personal one.

Finally, Miriam Silva addressed the guests. Miriam participates in a number of boards, Multicultural and Ethnic Affairs Commission, the Muslim Women’s Association and Rotary as well as carrying a full-time job in the financial field. Miriam mentioned that she had grown up with Laila and Melati and had gone on a similar spiritual journey. Miriam’s presentation was more career focused but the three suggestions she gave for overcoming issues can be applied to life in general. These were to be yourself, hold yourself accountable for your actions and be of service to others; to have courage to move away from your comfort zone; to have mentors and seek advice from those who are more experienced than yourself.

After the presentations the guests were introduced to Elham who was demonstrating and displaying some of her calligraphy art work.  Elham has a BA in theology, and completed a course in Traditional wood art and Traditional music in Iran.

When we returned to the meeting room, the ladies happily answered questions about their careers and the Islamic faith. Many of the questions were regarding stereotypes about Muslim women and how they can be overcome. The main messages that came from this discussion were that there are over a billion Muslims in the world, we cannot generalize among one billion people. The event ended on a happy note at around 4:30pm with more conversations amongst guests and speakers.

– Manal